Lou Strolger

Observatory Scientist
 

Strolger is an Observatory Scientist in the Science Mission Office. He is primarily concerned with clues to the nature of supernova progenitors through bulk analyses; rates, environmental effects (star-formation, metallicity, etc.), and the global evolution of these properties over the history of the Universe. He is also involved in projects on four robotic telescopes; three in space-- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and The Wide-Field Infra-Red Space Telescope (WFIRST); and The RCT 1.3-meter on the ground. He is active in a number of initiatives addressing underrepresented minorities in astronomy and physics, and looking at approaches to improve recruitment and retention.

Education:

PhD in Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
MA in Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
BA in Physics, Earlham College

 

Science Interests:

  • Understanding supernova rates at high redshift, and in various low redshift environments
  • Using type Ia supernovae as distance indicators
  • Identifying more galactic Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars to: refining the distance ladder.
  • State of minority participation in the profession.

 

Research Topics: Supernovae, Supernova Rates, Observational Cosmology, Pulsating Variable Stars, Policy

 

Professional Websites:

Professional Website

 

ORCID ID: 0000-0002-7756-4440

To contact one of our research staff members
please call 410-338-4700 or view the index for their email alias